Tuesday, November 28, 2006

Old


Re-scanned this old image this weekend for conceptart.org. It was done about a year out of school. I was a real slave to my reference at that time. Also some "interesting" color choices.Brings back memories of drying times.

11 comments:

Ryan Wood said...

It's good to see the old-school skills. The colors & brushstrokes on his face, really nice work. I like that blue light on his face in the detail.

<-<--esoder<---<----<----- said...

Mark Behm? Formerly sound guru at Zelos?

If so, I have but one word for you...

Hammurabi!

--Eric Soderstrom - formerly President of the Sarah Scharf Fan Club at Zelos

Anders said...

well Mark, old but really good!!
impressive piece man!!
I agree with Ryan for the light job
everything is perfect here, clothes, skins, mood...
one of my favourite of your works!

robertc said...

hey mark, the cop in the back so looks like you! amazing details and colors in this illustration man.

Mark said...

Great picture. The style reminds me of the Robert McGuiness/Frank McCarthy James Bond Posters of the 60s.

Great stuff!

Alina Chau said...

LOve this piece!! WOW!

Anonymous said...

Great work! How did you get away from being a slave to the reference?

Mark Behm said...

Thanks everybody. BTW, no I'm not the guy from Zelos. :/
Felicity -> Good question. It was mostly getting over the fear of it. I was very much into the golden age illustrators who swore by reference, be it life or photographic. At one point, after years of painting from the figure, I tried it without a model and it seemed to work. This was a huge shock to me that I could get the lighting to model the form. The brain must build a catalog of similarities that occur with similar lighting situations. Now when I use reference it's to see "what does a Napoleonic Era foot soldier's uniform look like" or something like that. If I use a reference for lighting, I'll do what I can to study it and commit it's patterns to memory, internalizing it, thinking about what is causing what hi light or shadow. Then I go and paint without referring back to the image and I'm better able to handle that situation next time it comes up. I think it was very important for me to go through the stage of being able to draw and paint exactly what I saw, I think it's even more important to break away from that when it's time.

Andrew Glazebrook said...

Really great !!

marcobucci said...

Good words. I only began to explore what you're remarking on here from something you said to me a couple of years ago. To this day I can recite a few very poignant sentences from that e-mail that really strike a chord with me. Good thing for these blogs! Keeps us all sketching.

Anonymous said...

Thanks so much for taking time to reply. I've just started figure/life drawing so I have a way to go but I do sense it is important. I'm still a slave to it so I really envy your freedom!